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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/acpd-13-4289-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acpd-13-4289-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 15 Feb 2013

Research article | 15 Feb 2013

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript for further review has not been submitted.

Long-range transport of biomass burning smoke to Finland in 2006

L. Riuttanen1, M. Dal Maso1,2, G. de Leeuw1,3, I. Riipinen4, L. Sogacheva3, V. Vakkari1, L. Laakso3, and M. Kulmala1 L. Riuttanen et al.
  • 1Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 48, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
  • 2Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, 33101 Tampere, Finland
  • 3Finnish Meteorological Institute, Erik Palmenin aukio, 00560 Helsinki, Finland
  • 4Department of Applied Environmental Science and Bert Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden

Abstract. Finland experienced extraordinary smoke episodes in 2006. The smoke was measured at the three SMEAR measurement network stations in Finland after it had been transported several hundreds of kilometers from burning areas in Eastern Europe. A trajectory method combining MODIS fire detections and HYSPLIT trajectories enabled us to separate the effect of biomass burning smoke from the measured concentrations and also study the changes in the smoke during its transport. The long-range transported smoke included at least NOx, SO2, CO2, CO, black carbon and fine aerosol particles, peaking at 100 to 200 nm size. The most reliable smoke markers were CO and SO2, especially when combined with particle data, for which black carbon or the condensation sink are very effective parameters separating the smoke episodes from no-smoke episodes. Signs of fresh secondary particles was observed based on the particle number size distribution data. While transported from south to north, particles grew in size, even after transport of tens of hours and several hundreds of kilometres. No new aerosol particle formation events were observed at the measurement sites during the smoke periods.

L. Riuttanen et al.
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Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
L. Riuttanen et al.
L. Riuttanen et al.
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