Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/acp-2017-274
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
28 Mar 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Comparison of ozone profiles and influences from the tertiary ozone maximum in the night-to-day ratio above Switzerland
Lorena Moreira, Klemens Hocke, and Niklaus Kämpfer Institute of Applied Physics and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
Abstract. Stratospheric and middle mesospheric ozone profiles have been continually measured by the GROMOS (GROund-based Millimeter-wave Ozone Spectrometer) microwave radiometer since 1994 above Bern, Switzerland (46.95° N, 7.44° E, 577 m). GROMOS is part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). A new version for the retrieval of ozone profiles has been developed with the aim to improve the altitude range of retrieval profiles. GROMOS profiles from this new retrieval version have been compared to coincident ozone profiles obtained by the satellite limb sounder Aura/MLS. The study covers the stratosphere and middle mesosphere from 50 to 0.05 hPa (from 21 to 70 km) and extends over the period from July 2009 to November 2016, which results in more than 3500 coincident profiles available for the comparison. GROMOS and Aura/MLS profiles agree within 3 % for the altitude range from 25 to 55 km, with standard deviations of the mean relative differences around 5 % from 30 to 40 km and tending to 10 % towards the lower and upper stratosphere. Above the stratosphere, the mean relative differences and its standard deviations are increasing with altitude up to 50 % at 70 km. In addition, we have observed the annual variation of nighttime ozone in the middle mesosphere, at 0.05 hPa (70 km), characterised by the enhancement of ozone during wintertime for both ground-based and space-based measurements. This behaviour is explained by the middle mesospheric maximum of ozone (MMM). On the other hand, the amplitude of the diurnal variation, night-to-day ratio (NDR), is not as strong as the observed one at higher latitudes, nevertheless we observe the winter anomaly of the night-to-day ratio.

Citation: Moreira, L., Hocke, K., and Kämpfer, N.: Comparison of ozone profiles and influences from the tertiary ozone maximum in the night-to-day ratio above Switzerland, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., doi:10.5194/acp-2017-274, in review, 2017.
Lorena Moreira et al.
Lorena Moreira et al.
Lorena Moreira et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 233 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
179 37 17 233 8 15

Views and downloads (calculated since 28 Mar 2017)

Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 28 Mar 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 233 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

Thereof 232 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.

Country # Views %
  • 1

Saved

Discussed

Latest update: 26 Apr 2017
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
GROMOS (GROund-based Millimeterwave Ozone Spectrometer) has provided ozone profiles for the NDACC since 1994. A new retrieval version for ozone profiles has been developed with the aim to improve the altitude range of retrieval profiles. We have performed a comparison between coincident profiles of GROMOS and Aura/MLS, resulting in agreement within 5 % in the stratosphere from July 2009 to November 2016. As a novel result we observe extensions of the tertiary ozone maximum at mid-latitudes.
GROMOS (GROund-based Millimeterwave Ozone Spectrometer) has provided ozone profiles for the...
Share