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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/acp-2017-254
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
27 Mar 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Gasoline aromatic: a critical determinant of urban secondary organic aerosol formation
Jianfei Peng1,a, Min Hu1,4, Zhuofei Du1, Yinhui Wang2, Jing Zheng1, Wenbin Zhang2, Yudong Yang1, Yanhong Qin1, Rong Zheng2, Yao Xiao1, Yusheng Wu1, Sihua Lu1, Zhijun Wu1, Song Guo1, Hongjun Mao3, and Shijin Shuai2 1State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
2State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
3College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China
4Beijing Innovation Center for Engineering Science and Advanced Technology, Peking University
anow at: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, US
Abstract. Gasoline vehicle exhaust is an important contributor to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in urban atmosphere. Fuel composition has considerable potential impact on gasoline SOA production, but this impact is still taken little account in the emission regulations due to the poor understanding of the link between fuel components and SOA production. Here, we present an in-depth study to investigate the impact of gasoline aromatic content on SOA production through chamber approach. A significant amplification factor of 3–6 for SOA productions from gasoline exhausts was observed as gasoline aromatic content rose from 29 % to 37 %. Considerably higher emissions of aromatic volatile organic compounds performed an essential role in the SOA production enhancement. Our findings indicate that gasoline aromatics have significant influence on ambient PM2.5 concentration in megacities and highlight that more stringent regulation on gasoline aromatic content will achieve unexpected benefit on air quality in urban areas.

Citation: Peng, J., Hu, M., Du, Z., Wang, Y., Zheng, J., Zhang, W., Yang, Y., Qin, Y., Zheng, R., Xiao, Y., Wu, Y., Lu, S., Wu, Z., Guo, S., Mao, H., and Shuai, S.: Gasoline aromatic: a critical determinant of urban secondary organic aerosol formation, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., doi:10.5194/acp-2017-254, in review, 2017.
Jianfei Peng et al.
Jianfei Peng et al.
Jianfei Peng et al.

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Short summary
Though an environmental chamber approach, we find that a small increase of aromatic content in the gasoline fuel will result in a large enhancement in the secondary organic aerosols formation from vehicle exhaust. The higher emissions of both monocycle and polycyclic aromatic organic compounds from the high-aromatic fuel performed the essential role. Our findings highlight the importance of more stringent regulation on gasoline aromatic content for air quality in urban areas.
Though an environmental chamber approach, we find that a small increase of aromatic content in...
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