Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
doi:10.5194/acp-2016-712
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
05 Oct 2016
Review status
A revision of this discussion paper was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Sensitivity of formaldehyde (HCHO) column measurements from a geostationary satellite to aerosol temporal variation in East Asia
Hyeong-Ahn Kwon1, Rokjin J. Park1, Jaein I. Jeong1, Seungun Lee1, Gonzalo González Abad2, Thomas P. Kurosu3, Paul I. Palmer4, and Kelly Chance2 1School of Earth and Environmental Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
2Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
3Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, USA
4School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
Abstract. We examine upcoming geostationary satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns in East Asia and the retrieval sensitivity to the temporal variation of air mass factor (AMF) considering the presence of aerosols. Observation system simulation experiments (OSSE) were conducted using a combination of a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem), a radiative transfer model (VLIDORT), and a HCHO retrieval algorithm developed for Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS), which will be launched in 2019. Application of the retrieval algorithm to simulated hourly radiances yields the retrieved HCHO column concentrations, which are then compared with the GEOS-Chem HCHO columns as a true value for the evaluation of the retrieval algorithm. In order to examine the retrieval sensitivity to the temporal variation of AMF, we compare the retrieved HCHO columns using monthly versus hourly AMF values and find that the HCHO vertical columns with hourly AMF are in better agreement with the true values, relative to those with monthly AMF. The differences between hourly and monthly AMF range from −0.70 to 0.73 in absolute value and are mainly caused by temporal changes of aerosol chemical composition: scattering aerosol enhances AMF, whereas absorbing aerosol reduces it. The temporal variations of AMF caused by aerosols increase and decrease HCHO VCDs by 84 % and 34 %, respectively, compared to HCHO VCDs using monthly AMF. We apply our calculated AMF with the aerosol effects to OMI HCHO products in March, 2006 when Asian dust storms occurred and find −18 %–33 % changes in the retrieved HCHO columns in East Asia. The impact of aerosols cannot be neglected for future geostationary observations.

Citation: Kwon, H.-A., Park, R. J., Jeong, J. I., Lee, S., González Abad, G., Kurosu, T. P., Palmer, P. I., and Chance, K.: Sensitivity of formaldehyde (HCHO) column measurements from a geostationary satellite to aerosol temporal variation in East Asia, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., doi:10.5194/acp-2016-712, in review, 2016.
Hyeong-Ahn Kwon et al.
Hyeong-Ahn Kwon et al.

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Short summary
A geostationary satellite can measure daytime hourly HCHO columns. Atmospheric conditions such as synoptic meteorology and the presence of other gases and aerosols may affect HCHO measurements. We examine the effects of their temporal variation on the HCHO measurement of a geostationary satellite in East Asia. We find that the hourly variation of other species could be important. Especially, the inclusion of hourly aerosol variation in the retrieval could lead to improving HCHO measurements.
A geostationary satellite can measure daytime hourly HCHO columns. Atmospheric conditions such...
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