Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 13, 26529-26578, 2013
www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/13/26529/2013/
doi:10.5194/acpd-13-26529-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Review Status
This discussion paper is under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP).
Atmospheric inversion of the surface CO2 flux with 13CO2 constraint
J. M. Chen1,2, G. Mo1, and F. Deng1
1Department of Geography and Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G3, Canada
2International Institute of Earth System Science, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210093, China

Abstract. Observations of 13CO2 at 73 sites compiled in the GLOBALVIEW database are used for an additional constraint in a global atmospheric inversion of the surface CO2 flux using CO2 observations at 210 sites for the 2002–2004 period for 39 land regions and 11 ocean regions. This constraint is implemented using the 13CO2/CO2 flux ratio modeled with a terrestrial ecosystem model and an ocean model. These models simulate 13CO2 discrimination rates of terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration and ocean-atmosphere diffusion processes. In both models, the 13CO2 disequilibrium between fluxes to and from the atmosphere is considered due to the historical change in atmospheric 13CO2 concentration. For the 2002–2004 period, the 13CO2 constraint on the inversion increases the total land carbon sink from 3.40 to 3.70 Pg C yr−1 and decreases the total oceanic carbon sink from 1.48 to 1.12 Pg C yr−1. The largest changes occur in tropical areas: a considerable decrease in the carbon source in the Amazon forest, and this decrease is mostly compensated by increases in the ocean region immediately west of the Amazon and the southeast Asian land region. Our further investigation through different treatments of the 13CO2/CO2 flux ratio used in the inversion suggests that variable spatial distributions of the 13CO2 isotopic discrimination rate simulated by the models over land and ocean have considerable impacts on the spatial distribution of the inverted CO2 flux over land and the inversion results are not sensitive to errors in the estimated disequilibria over land and ocean.

Citation: Chen, J. M., Mo, G., and Deng, F.: Atmospheric inversion of the surface CO2 flux with 13CO2 constraint, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 13, 26529-26578, doi:10.5194/acpd-13-26529-2013, 2013.
 
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