Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 12, 21355-21397, 2012
www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/12/21355/2012/
doi:10.5194/acpd-12-21355-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
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This discussion paper has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP.
Impact of Gobi desert dust on aerosol chemistry of Xi'an, inland China during spring 2009: differences in composition and size distribution between the urban ground surface and the mountain atmosphere
G. H. Wang1, B. H. Zhou2,3, C. L. Cheng1, J. J. Cao1, J. J. Meng1, J. J. Li1, J. Tao4, R. J. Zhang5, and P. Q. Fu6
1State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi'an 710075, China
2School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Xi'an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi'an 710055, China
3Department of Geographical Science and Environmental Engineering, Baoji University of Arts and Sciences, Baoji 721013, China
4South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, China Ministry of Environmental Protection, Guangzhou 510655, China
5Key Laboratory of Regional Climate-Environment for Temperate East Asia, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
6Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China

Abstract. Composition and size distribution of atmospheric aerosols from Xi'an city (~400 m, altitude) in inland China during the spring of 2009 including a massive dust event on 24 April were measured and compared with a parallel measurement at the summit (2060 m, altitude) of Mt. Hua, an alpine site nearby Xi'an. EC, OC and major ions in the city were 2–22 times higher than those on the mountaintop during the whole sampling period. Sulfate was the highest species in the nonevent time in Xi'an and Mt. Hua, followed by nitrate, OC and NH4+. In contrast, OC was the most abundant in the event at both sites, followed by sulfate, nitrate and Ca2+. Compared to those on the urban ground surface aerosols in the elevated troposphere over Mt. Hua contain more sulfate and less nitrate, because HNO3 is formed faster than H2SO4 and thus long-range transport of HNO3 is less significant than that of H2SO4. An increased water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) was observed for the dust samples from Xi'an, indicating a significant deposition of anthropogenic WSON onto dust and/or an input of biogenic WSON from Gobi desert.

As far as we know, it is for the first time to perform a simultaneous observation of aerosol chemistry between the ground surface and the free troposphere in inland East Asia. Our results showed that fine particles are more acidic on the mountaintop than on the urban ground surface in the nonevent, mainly due to continuous oxidation of SO2 to produce H2SO4 during the transport from lowland areas to the alpine atmosphere. However, we found the urban fine particles became more acidic in the event than in the nonevent, in contrast to the mountain atmosphere, where fine particles were less acidic when dust was present. The opposite changes in acidity of fine particles at both sites during the event are mostly caused by enhanced heterogeneous formation of nitrate onto dust in the urban air and decreased formation of nitrate in the mountain troposphere. In comparison to those during the nonevent Cl and NO3 in the urban air during the event significantly shifted toward coarse particles. Such redistributions were further pronounced on the mountaintop when dust was present, resulting in both ions almost entirely staying in coarse particles. On the contrary, no significant spatial difference in size distribution of SO42− was found between the urban ground surface and the mountain atmosphere, dominating in the fine mode (<2.1 μm) during the nonevent and comparably distributing in the fine (<2.1 μm) and coarse (>2.1 μm) modes during the event.


Citation: Wang, G. H., Zhou, B. H., Cheng, C. L., Cao, J. J., Meng, J. J., Li, J. J., Tao, J., Zhang, R. J., and Fu, P. Q.: Impact of Gobi desert dust on aerosol chemistry of Xi'an, inland China during spring 2009: differences in composition and size distribution between the urban ground surface and the mountain atmosphere, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 12, 21355-21397, doi:10.5194/acpd-12-21355-2012, 2012.
 
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