Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 11, 3461-3492, 2011
www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/11/3461/2011/
doi:10.5194/acpd-11-3461-2011
© Author(s) 2011. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Review Status
This discussion paper has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP.
Condensational uptake of semivolatile organic compounds in gasoline engine exhaust onto pre-existing inorganic particles
S.-M. Li1, J. Liggio1, L. Graham2,*, G. Lu1, J. Brook1, C. Stroud1, J. Zhang1, P. Makar1, and M. D. Moran1
1Air Quality Research Division, Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4, Canada
2Air Quality Research Division, Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0H3, Canada
*now at: Department of Chemistry, University of Christchurch, Canterbury, 8041, New Zealand

Abstract. This paper presents the results of laboratory studies on the condensational uptake of gaseous organic compounds in the exhaust of a light-duty gasoline engine onto preexisting sulfate and nitrate seed particles. Significant condensation of the gaseous organic compounds in the exhaust occurs onto pre-existing inorganic particles on a time scale of 2–5 min. The amount of condensed organic mass (COM) is proportional to the seed particle mass, suggesting that the uptake is due to dissolution, not adsorption. The solubility decreases as a power function with increased dilution of the exhaust, ranging from 0.23 g/g at a dilution ratio of 81, to 0.025 g/g at a dilution ratio of 2230. The solubility increases nonlinearly with increasing concentration of the total hydrocarbons in the gas phase (THC), rising from 0.12 g/g to 0.26 g/g for a CTHC increase of 1 to 18 μg m−3, suggesting that more organics are partitioned into the particles at higher gas phase concentrations. In terms of gas-particle partitioning, the condensational uptake of THC gases in gasoline engine exhaust can account for up to 30% of the total gas+particle THC. By incorporating the present findings, regional air quality modelling results suggest that the condensational uptake of THC onto sulfate particles alone can be comparable to the primary particle mass under moderately polluted ambient conditions. These findings are important for modelling and regulating the air quality impacts of gasoline vehicular emissions.

Citation: Li, S.-M., Liggio, J., Graham, L., Lu, G., Brook, J., Stroud, C., Zhang, J., Makar, P., and Moran, M. D.: Condensational uptake of semivolatile organic compounds in gasoline engine exhaust onto pre-existing inorganic particles, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 11, 3461-3492, doi:10.5194/acpd-11-3461-2011, 2011.
 
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