Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 361-390, 2010
www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/10/361/2010/
doi:10.5194/acpd-10-361-2010
© Author(s) 2010. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
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This discussion paper has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP.
In situ measurements of molecular iodine in the marine boundary layer: the link to macroalgae and the implications for O3, IO, OIO and NOx
R.-J. Huang1, K. Seitz2, J. Buxmann2, D. Poehler2, K. E. Hornsby3, L. J. Carpenter3, U. Platt2, and T. Hoffmann1
1Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Duesbergweg 10–14, 55128 Mainz, Germany
2Institute for Environmental Physics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
3Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK

Abstract. "Single-point" in situ measurements of molecular iodine (I2) were carried out in the coastal marine boundary layer (MBL) using diffusion denuders in combination with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Comparison measurements were taken at Mace Head and Mweenish Bay, on the West Coast of Ireland. The observed mixing ratios of I2 at Mweenish Bay are much higher than that at Mace Head, indicating the emissions of I2 are correlated with the local algal biomass density and algae species. The concentration levels of I2 were found to correlate inversely with tidal height and correlate positively with the concentration levels of O3 in the surrounding air. However, the released I2 can also lead to O3 destruction via the reaction of O3 with iodine atoms that are formed by the photolysis of I2 during the day and via the reaction of I2 with NOx at night. IO and OIO were measured by long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS). The results show that the concentrations of both daytime and nighttime IO are correlated with the mixing ratios of I2. OIO was observed not only during the day but also, for the first time at both Mace Head and Mweenish Bay, at night. In addition, I2 was measured simultaneously by the LP-DOAS technique and compared with the "single-point" in situ measurement. The results suggest that the local algae sources dominate the inorganic iodine chemistry at Mace Head and Mweenish Bay.

Citation: Huang, R.-J., Seitz, K., Buxmann, J., Poehler, D., Hornsby, K. E., Carpenter, L. J., Platt, U., and Hoffmann, T.: In situ measurements of molecular iodine in the marine boundary layer: the link to macroalgae and the implications for O3, IO, OIO and NOx, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 361-390, doi:10.5194/acpd-10-361-2010, 2010.
 
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