Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 22093-22107, 2010
www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/10/22093/2010/
doi:10.5194/acpd-10-22093-2010
© Author(s) 2010. This work is distributed
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This discussion paper has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP.
Impact of different definitions of clear-sky flux on the determination of longwave cloud radiative forcing: NICAM simulation results
B. J. Sohn1, T. Nakajima2, M. Satoh2, and H.-S. Jang1
1School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747, Korea
2Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8568, Japan

Abstract. Using one month of the cloud-resolving Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) simulations, we examined the impact of different definitions of clear-sky flux on the determination of longwave cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Because the satellite-like cloud-free composite preferentially samples drier conditions relative to the all-sky mean state, the conventional clear-sky flux calculation using the all-sky mean state in the model may represent a more humid atmospheric state in comparison to the cloud-free state. The drier bias is evident for the cloud-free composite in the NICAM simulations, causing an overestimation of the longwave CRF by about 10% compared to the NICAM simulated longwave CRF. Overall, water vapor contributions of up to 10% of the total longwave CRF should be added to make the NICAM-generated cloud forcing comparable to the satellite measurements.

Citation: Sohn, B. J., Nakajima, T., Satoh, M., and Jang, H.-S.: Impact of different definitions of clear-sky flux on the determination of longwave cloud radiative forcing: NICAM simulation results, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 10, 22093-22107, doi:10.5194/acpd-10-22093-2010, 2010.
 
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